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Competition Overlap Index

Competition Overlap Index

Please note that the competitions that are listed under “See Also” are not to be seen as identical competitions. They are simply competitions that require similar skill sets or may be competitions that have a similar central focus. This index’s purpose is to provide members that want to try new competitions with a basic understanding of how some competitions relate to others. This index is not designed to be a comprehensive explanation of all of the competitive events and their relationships. We hope that if you find a competition similar to one that you enjoy, you take the time to further explore that competition.


 

How to use the Competition Overlap Index:

Listed in the largest font is the high school competition in question. It’s description is from the national TSA website. Under HIGH SCHOOL, other high school competitions that incorporate similar principles or material are listed. Under MIDDLE SCHOOL, middle school competitions that are related to the high school competitions are listed. Sometimes middle school competitions are mirror images of high school competitions, but we have included other competitions that we think that members competing in the original competition might be interested in. If you are a High Schooler viewing this, your primary interest will obviously be in the HIGH SCHOOL section. If you are in Middle School, we encourage you to look not only at the MIDDLE SCHOOL competitions, but also at the other HIGH SCHOOL competitions listed so that you are familiar with the options that you have in the near future.

3D Animation: Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] to six [6] members per state) demonstrate their knowledge of 3D animation technology and design skills to creatively solve the challenge posted on the national TSA website.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Computer Aided Design (CAD), Architecture; This competition also utilizes the use of computer software to animate 3D objects, but the focus is very specifically architecture.

Computer Aided Design (CAD), Engineering; Similar to CAD Architecture, this competition utilizes computer software to design engineering tools and other manufactured products.
Scientific Visualizations (SciVis); This competition allows the member(s) to use either 2D or 3D computer design software to animate a presentation to a specifically given STEM topic.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: CAD Foundations; This competition is centered on developing a 2D representation of an engineering part/object, but would also be a good start to developing the skills necessary to compete in 3D animation and the other High School CAD competitions.

STEM Animation; This competition also uses computer design tools, but to inform, communicate, and analyze a topic or subject specifically related to STEM.

 

Animatronics:  Participants (one [1] team per chapter) demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept. Sound, lights, and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: System Control Technology;  this competition is a work on site event where your team of 1 to 3 members analyze a given problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

 

Architectural Design:  Participants (one [1] team, or one [1] individual, per chapter; one entry per team or individual) develop a set of architectural plans and related materials for an annual architectural design challenge and construct a physical, as well as a computer-generated model, to accurately depict their design.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Computer Aided Design (CAD), Architecture; This competition similarly develops architectural plans, but does so through the use of computer software to digitally design the plans.

Structural Design and Engineering; This event requires the manufacturing of a structure that addresses the specific problem given. It is then put through testing to ensure its quality before it is tested (destructively) in the competition.

Transportation Modeling; This competition requires the member to physically produce a scale model of the vehicle to the annual design problem. It relates to architectural design by requiring a physical model, as well as developing blueprints for the design.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Off The Grid; This competition is very similar to architectural design in the development of the architectural plans for a building and the physical fabrication of the design. Off the Grid however, is explicitly focused on developing a sustainable home in a specific environment, whereas the architectural design problem changes annually.

Structural Engineering; (see above “Structural Design and Engineering)
 

Biotechnology Design:  Participants (three [3] teams of two to six [2-6] members per state) select a contemporary biotechnology problem (that relates to the current year’s published topic) and demonstrate understanding of it through documented research, the development of a solution, a display (including an optional model or prototype), and an effective multimedia presentation.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Medical Technology; In this event participants conduct research on a contemporary medical technology issue of their choosing, document their research, and create a display. If appropriate, a model or prototype depicting an aspect of the issue may be included in the display. Semifinalists give a presentation.

Biotechnology; Essentially the same event as Biotechnology Design, but on a Middle School Level.

 

Chapter Team:  Participants (one [1] team of six [6] members per chapter) take a written parliamentary procedures test in order to qualify for the semifinals, in which they complete an opening ceremony, items of business, parliamentary actions, and a closing ceremony within a specified time period.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Chapter Team; Essentially the same competition, but at the Middle School level.

 

Children’s Stories:  Participants (one [1] team, or one [1] individual, per chapter) create an illustrated children's story of high artistic, instructional, and social value. The narrative may be written in prose or poetry and take the form of a fable, adventure story, or other structure. The physical story book should be of high quality and designed to meet the year’s given theme. The story must have a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) focus.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Scientific Visualization (SciVis); In this event you use your creativity to inform the reader or viewer on something STEM related. You will use either 2D or 3D computer graphics tools and design processes to communicate, inform, analyze, and/or illustrate a STEM topic, idea, subject, or concept.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Children’s Stories; Essentially the same competition, but at the Middle School level

 

Coding:  Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two to three [2-3] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Video Game Design; This competition does not focus as much on coding, but it does require similar problem solving skills and understanding of technology.

Webmaster; This competition is specifically to design and launch a website. Basic knowledge of coding and design is necessary, but the broader focus is on launching a website that is comprehensive of the specific regulations for the website.

Software Development; Participants develop a software-development project. Many of the necessary skills are similar to those needed for coding.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Coding; This competition requires a written test to demonstrate the member’s knowledge of coding, and the on-site problem is less rigorous than the high school version of this competition.

System Control Technology; Members use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem. They build and program this device, so an understanding of coding is necessary to adequately program the device.

Video Game Design; (see above)

Website Design; (see above ‘Webmaster’)

Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Architecture: Participants (two [2] individuals per state) use complex computer graphic skills, tools, and processes to develop representations of architectural subjects, such as foundation and/or floor plans, and/or elevation drawings, and/or details of architectural ornamentation or cabinetry.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: 3D  Animation; In this event participants demonstrate their knowledge of 3D animation technology and design skills to creatively solve the challenge posted on the national TSA website.

Architectural Design;  In this competition you will develop a set of architectural plans and related materials for an annual architectural design challenge and construct a physical, as well as a computer-generated model, to accurately depict their design.

Computer Aided Design (CAD), Engineering; Similar to CAD Architecture, this competition utilizes computer software to design engineering tools and other manufactured products.
Scientific Visualizations (SciVis); This competition allows the member(s) to use either 2D or 3D computer design software to animate a presentation to a specifically given STEM topic.

Structural Design and Engineering; This event requires the manufacturing of a structure that addresses the specific problem given. It is then put through testing to ensure its quality before it is tested (destructively) in the competition.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: CAD Foundations; This competition is centered on developing a 2D representation of an engineering part or object, but would also be a good start to developing the skills necessary to compete in 3D animation and the other High School CAD competitions.

Off The Grid; In this event, participants research a sustainable architectural design for a country of the team’s choosing (cannot be participants home country) Participants will then create a display and model of the architectural design that was designed or a certain aspect of the design.

Structural Engineering; (see above “Structural Design and Engineering”)

 

Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Engineering:  Participants (two [2] individuals per state) use complex computer graphic skills, tools, and processes to develop three-dimensional representations of engineering subjects such as a machine part, tool, device, or manufactured product.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: 3D Animation; In this event participants demonstrate their knowledge of 3D animation technology and design skills to creatively solve the challenge posted on the national TSA website.

Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Architecture; In this event, members use the CAD software similar to CAD Engineering, but the intent is to design architectural subjects and plans.

Scientific Visualizations (SciVis); This competition allows the member(s) to use either 2D or 3D computer design software to animate a presentation to a specifically given STEM topic.

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM); Members produce a product using modern manufacturing processes and give a live promotional sales pitch to judges.

Engineering Design; Participants develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: CAD Foundations; This competition is centered on developing a 2D representation of an engineering part or object, but would also be a good start to developing the skills necessary to compete in 3D animation and the other High School CAD competitions.

STEM Animation; Members use computer software to communicate, inform, analyze and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept that specifically relates to STEM.

 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM): Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) design, fabricate, and use additive and/or subtractive manufacturing of any traditional, Computer Numerical Control (CNC), 3D printing, or laser technology available to create a promotional TSA product that will showcase the current conference city and/or state. Semifinalist teams assemble their entry and give a live promotional sales pitch to judges.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Architecture; In this event, members use the CAD software similar to CAD Engineering, but the intent is to design architectural subjects and plans.

Scientific Visualizations (SciVis); This competition allows the member(s) to use either 2D or 3D computer design software to animate a presentation to a specifically given STEM topic.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: CAD Foundations; This competition is centered on developing a 2D representation of an engineering part or object, but would also be a good start to developing the skills necessary to compete in 3D animation and the other High School CAD competitions.

STEM Animation; Members use computer software to communicate, inform, analyze and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept that specifically relates to STEM.

Debating Technological Issues: Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] members per state) work together to prepare for a debate against a team from another chapter. The teams will be instructed to take either the Pro or Con side of a selected subtopic.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Essays on Technology; Participants write a research based-essay, so they prepare similarly to Debating Technological Issues. Additionally, the material for the competitions is related.

Technology Bowl; This event is also a head-to-head competition, but in the style of a quiz bowl competition. This event is objective and question-answer format, unlike Debating Technology Issues. It includes a written test over STEM related questions.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Essays on Technology; (See above “Essays on Technology”)

Challenging Technology Issues; Participants develop a debate style presentation that explains the opposing views on a current technology issue.

Tech Bowl; (See above “Technology Bowl”)

Digital Video Production: Participants (three [3] teams per state; an individual may participate solo in this team event) develop a public service announcement and a digital video (with sound) that focuses on the given year’s theme.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: On Demand Video; Participants have a team with 2-6 members that write, shoot and edit a 60 second video on site during the conference.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Community Service Video; Participants submit a video that depicts the local chapter’s service with the American Cancer Society.

STEM Animation; STEM Animation focuses more on STEM related topics and is not an on site event. Participants in this event will create a STEM relating animation according to the current year’s theme.

 

Dragster Design: Participants (two [2] individuals per chapter; one [1] try per individual) design, produce a working drawing for, and build a CO2-powered dragster.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Flight Endurance; Participants construct a plane and analyze flight principles. The construction differences between an aircraft and dragster are very different, but the basic principles are the same.

Structural Design and Engineering; Participants build a structure to meet the requirements for the competition. It is tested thoroughly to ensure quality. Its main relationship to Dragster Design is simply the hands on construction aspect.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Dragster; Essentially the same competition, but on the Middle School level.

Flight; Participants construct an aircraft to be launched with the goal of it staying in the air for the longest possible period of time. Similar to Flight Endurance and Structural Design and Engineering, the main overlap between the competitions is the hands on construction.

Junior Solar Sprint; Members design and race a solar-powered car. This competition is very similar to dragster in its essence, but the physical vehicles and mechanisms through which they are constructed and tested are vastly different.

Structural Engineering; (See above “Structural Design and Engineering)

 

Engineering Design: Participants (three [3] teams of three [3] or more members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

 

Essays on Technology:  Participants (three [3] individuals per state) write a research-based essay (using two or more sources provided on-site) that makes insightful connections about a current technological topic.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Debating Technology Issues; This event is a head-to-head style debate, but the material and subject matter of the events can be similar.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Essays on Technology; Essentially the same competition, but on the Middle School Level.

Challenging Technology Issues; Participants come up with a debate-style presentation over a current technology issue. This presentation is subjective, whereas the essay is subjective. However, as with Debating Technology Issues, material for the competitions can be similar.

 

Extemporaneous Speech: Participants (three [3] individuals per state) verbally communicate their knowledge of technology or TSA subjects by giving a speech after having drawn a card on which a technology or TSA topic is written.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Debating Technology Issues; Participants have a team of 2 members who work together to prepare to debate another team from a different chapter.

Prepared Presentation; In this event participants will deliver a presentation using a slide deck on a topic that is provided on site.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Career Prep; In this event you must research and then verbally communicate your knowledge of a STEM career that corresponds with the current year’s theme which can be found on the National TSA website.

Challenging Technology Issues; Participants work together to prepare and deliver a debate-style presentation with participants explaining opposing views of a current technology issue.

Prepared Speech; In this event participants prepare a speech based on the current year’s theme and then deliver the speech.

 

Fashion Design and Technology: Participants (three [3] teams of two to four [2-4] members per state) research, design, and create a portfolio and wearable prototype that reflect the current year’s theme. Semifinalist teams participate in a presentation/interview in which they present their garment designs to judges.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Mass Production; This competition also focuses on creating a marketable prototype to follow with the given theme. This prototype, however, is not a fashion design.

 

Flight Endurance: Participants (two [2] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per individual) analyze flight principles with a rubber band-powered model aircraft.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Dragster Design; This competition has members create a CO2 powered dragster to race it against other dragsters. The main similarity is in the construction process of the vehicles.

Structural Design and Engineering; Participants build a structure to meet the requirements for the competition. It is tested thoroughly to ensure quality. Its main relationship to Flight Endurance is simply the hands on construction aspect.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Dragster; (See above “Dragster Design”)

Structural Engineering; (See above “Structural Design and Engineering”)

 

Future Technology Teacher:  Participants (two [2] individuals per chapter) investigate technology education preparation programs in higher education and test their potential as a future technology educator.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Career Prep; This competition has members research a technology related career that relates to a given theme. They prepare a resume, and participate in a mock interview.

Music Production: Participants (three [3] teams per state; an individual may participate solo in this team event) produce an original musical piece that is designed to be played during the national TSA conference opening or closing general sessions.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: On-Demand Video; In this event, students film and edit a 60 second video. Similar editing skills and experience are necessary for both events.

 

On Demand Video:  Participants (one [1] team of two to six [2-6] members per chapter) write, shoot, and edit a 60-second video on site during the conference.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Music Production; In this event, students produce their own music piece. The editing skills needed for both competitions have similar aspects.

Digital Video Production; Members develop a public service announcement and a digital video (with sound) that focuses on the given year’s theme.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Community Service Video; Participants create and submit a video that depicts the local TSA chapter’s service with the American Cancer Society, national TSA’s community service partner.

Photographic Technology:  Participants (one [1] individual per chapter) demonstrate understanding of and expertise in using photographic and imaging technology processes to convey a message based on a theme. Semifinalists record images and then utilize graphic editing software to prepare a single final image as a solution to an on-site prompt.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Promotional Design; Participants use computerized graphic communications layout and design skills in the production of a promotional resource for TSA. The layout editing skills carry over between the two competitions.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Digital Photography; Participants produce a digital album consisting of color or black and white digital photographs that represent or relate to a chosen theme.

 

Prepared Presentation: Participants (three [3] individuals per state) deliver an oral presentation, using a digital slide deck, on a topic provided on-site.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Extemporaneous Speech; Members give a speech on a topic that they receive on sight. Both competitions utilize presentation skills.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Challenging Technology Issues; Participants work together to prepare and deliver a debate-style presentation with participants explaining opposing views of a current technology issue.

Prepared Speech; Participants (three [3] individuals per state) deliver a speech that reflects the theme of the current year’s national conference.


Promotional Design: Participants (three [3] individuals per state) use computerized graphic communications layout and design skills in the production of a promotional resource for TSA.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Scientific Visualizations (SciVis); This competition also uses computerized graphics for 2D and 3D animation to design processes to communicate, inform, analyze, and/or illustrate a STEM topic, idea, subject, or concept.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Promotional Marketing; Participants (one [1] individual per chapter; one (1) entry each) create marketing tools that could be used in a TSA Promotional Kit. The theme and required elements for this event will be posted on the TSA website under Competitions/Themes and Problems.

Inventions and Innovations; Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

 

Scientific Visualization (SciVis):  Participants (three [3] teams per state; an individual may participate solo in this team event) use either 2D or 3D computer graphics tools and design processes to communicate, inform, analyze, and/or illustrate a STEM topic, idea, subject, or concept.cod

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: 3D Animation; In this event participants demonstrate their knowledge of 3D animation technology and design skills to creatively solve the challenge posted on the national TSA website.

Digital Video Production; Members develop a digital video (with sound) that focuses on the given year’s theme.

On Demand Video; Participants have a team with 2-6 members that write, shoot and edit a 60 second video on site during the conference.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: STEM Animation; This competition also uses computer design tools, but to inform, communicate, and analyze a topic or subject specifically related to STEM.

Promotional Design; Participants use computerized graphic communications layout and design skills in the production of a promotional resource for TSA. Within SciVis you must you 2D or 3D computer graphic tools and designs which could lead into promotional design.

 

Software Development: Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Coding; This competition is purely coding to solve a given problem by developing a software program, but the basics of coding carry over to Software Development.

Video Game Design; In this event, participants create their own video game following certain parameters. A basic knowledge of coding is helpful in this creation.

Webmaster; Participants launch a comprehensive website that follows the parameters given. Again, a basic knowledge of coding is very helpful in developing a website.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Coding; (See above “Coding”)

Video Game Design; (See above “Video Game Design”)

Website Design; (See above “Webmaster”)

System Control Technology: Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Animatronics; Participants (one [1] team per chapter) demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept. Sound, lights, and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

Coding; This competition is purely coding to solve a given problem by developing a software program, but the basics of coding carry over to System Control Technology.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Coding; (See above “Coding”)

System Control Technology; Essentially the same competition, but at the Middle School level.

 

Technology Bowl: Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per chapter) demonstrate their knowledge of TSA and concepts addressed in the technology content standards by completing a written, objective test; semifinalist teams participate in question/response, head to head team competition.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

See Also: Debating Technology Issues; Participants work together to prepare for a debate against a team from another chapter. The teams will be instructed to take either the Pro or Con side of a selected subtopic.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Tech Bowl; Essentially the same competition, but at the Middle School Level.

Challenging Technology Issues; Participants work together to prepare and deliver a debate-style presentation with participants explaining opposing views of a current technology issue.

 

Technology Problem Solving:  Participants (one [1] team of two [2] individuals per chapter) use their skills in problem solving to develop a finite solution to a problem provided on site.

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: This competition’s problem solving skills can be useful and overlap in almost every other competition.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

See Also: Problem Solving; Participants (one team of two individuals per chapter) use problem solving skills to develop a finite solution to a problem provided on site.

Technical Design; Participants (one [1] team of two [2] individuals per chapter) demonstrate their ability to use the technical design process to solve an engineering design problem on site at the conference.